Volcanic alert level lowered to Orange / Volcano

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Soufrière Saint-Vincent volcano

Stratovolcano 1,220 m / 4,003 feet
West Indies, Saint-Vincent, 13.33 ° N / -61.18 ° W
Actual status: erupting (4 of 5)

Eruptions of the Soufrière Saint-Vincent volcano:

2020-21, 1979, 1902-03, 1880 ?, 1814, 1812, 1784, 1718 (historical eruptions observed)
Typical rash style:
effusive (lava dome extrusion) and explosive

Fri May 7, 2021, 07:29 AM

07:29 | BY: MARTIN

Volcanic danger zones of the Soufriere Saint-Vincent volcano (image: NEMO)

The National Emergency Management Organization (NEMO), in collaboration with scientists from the University of the West Indies, has decided to reduce the Volcanic alert level from “red” to “orange” as a significant decrease in volcano-tectonic earthquakes have been recorded. In addition, no explosion has occurred on the volcano since April 22.

The NEMO bulletin further cites:
“An orange volcano alert level means the volcano can resume explosions with less than twenty-four hours notice. As a result, the Government of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines has also decided that residents of communities in the Orange Zone from Petit Bordel to Gordon Yard on the leeward side of the island and up to Mount Young near from the RUBIS gas station on the windward side of the island, can return home and perform normal activities. “

Lahars (mudslides) could continue to occur if heavy rains remobilize the fresh ash deposits in the valleys, especially the Wallibou and Rabacca valleys.
Source: Update on volcano activity from the University of the West Indies Update on volcano activity May 7, 2021

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Huge column of ash generated yesterday by the Soufrière Saint-Vincent volcano (image: @ uwiseismic / twitter)
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Huge column of ash generated yesterday by the Soufrière Saint-Vincent volcano (image: @ uwiseismic / twitter)
The explosive eruption of the volcano continues. … read everything




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