Royal Caribbean changes Covid-19 vaccine requirements for cruise ships

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It appears that Royal Caribbean will require a Covid-19 vaccine for passengers on its cruises.

Royal Caribbean has updated its vaccine requirements page with new information that not only requires the Covid-19 vaccine, but also changed the minimum age for guests to be vaccinated to navigate.

On the Royal Caribbean website, there are now rules for cruises departing from the United States or the Bahamas, and rules for cruises departing from other international ports.

Vaccine requirements for cruises to the United States or Bahamas

On crossings to the United States or the Bahamas departing on or before August 1, Royal Caribbean will require all passengers aged 16 and over to complete all doses of their Covid-19 vaccine at least 14 days prior to departure.

On departures to the United States or the Bahamas after August 1, the age requirement for vaccination will be reduced from 16 to 12 years.

This means Royal Caribbean has lowered the minimum age for passengers to be fully vaccinated on Adventure of the Seas crossings from Nassau, Bahamas, from 18 to 16 and then 12.

Customers who booked on Adventure of the Seas this summer received an email from the cruise line confirming the change.

For anyone booked on a sail in the United States or the Bahamas who is younger than the minimum age to be vaccinated (i.e. children), will receive a SARS-Cov-2 test prior to boarding . If a guest under the required age is fully vaccinated, they should bring their original vaccination record on board, will not require testing, and should follow all vaccinated guest protocols throughout their vacation.

Royal Caribbean will also require proof of vaccination in addition to the usual travel documents to board the ship.

Acceptable proof of vaccination should be in the form of the original vaccination record issued by the country’s health authority or the health care provider who administered the vaccination (for example, the CDC vaccine registration card from the states -United).

The submitted vaccination record must show that the client is fully vaccinated. This means that the guest has completed the full cycle of doses required for the vaccine being administered (for example, received the second dose in a series of two doses) and the guest received the final dose at least 14 days before d ” arrive in the Bahamas or their cruise departure terminal in the United States

International cruises

Royal Caribbean will also require the Covid-19 vaccine from passengers aged 18 and over sailing from any other port, and they must have received all doses of the vaccine at least 14 days before departure.

As with cruises to the United States, proof of vaccination must be provided in one of two forms:

  1. the health authority of the country that administered the vaccination (for example, the US CDC vaccine registration card)
  2. the medical provider of the guest who administered the vaccination

Electronic immunization records will only be accepted for residents of countries where electronic documentation is the standard form issued (for example, a unique QR code).

Crew members

Royal Caribbean will continue its policy of requiring all crew members to be fully immunized.

In February 2021, Royal Caribbean announced that it would pursue a policy requiring its crew members to be vaccinated.

Meanwhile, Royal Caribbean has systematically brought its ships to ports in Texas and Florida to have crew members vaccinated.

Other cruise lines requiring the vaccine

Royal Caribbean is the latest cruise line to require its passengers to be vaccinated in order to be able to sail.

Norwegian Cruise Line has made the decision to require 100% of its guests and crew to be vaccinated by April 2021. Carnival has just announced its cruises to Alaska this year, guests will need to be fully vaccinated.

Many other companies have announced similar policies including Virgin Voyages, Celebrity Cruises, Princess Cruises and more.



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